It’s Easy to Take Our Health for Granted until It’s Taken from Us

One would think going in for a routine bladder procedure and coming out with dead bowel, an open wound the size of Texas, and an ileostomy bag would be the maximum health drama a person is allowed within a two-year period.

One would be wrong.

Trust me. This image is less gruesome than the wound. (Image from Pixabay, CC0 Public Domain, no attribution required)

Trust me. This image is less gruesome than my mom’s wound was. (Image from Pixabay, CC0 Public Domain, no attribution required)

Not content to let my mother’s 2014 surgical disaster get all the glory, lymphoma recently waltzed in and filled up her 2016 dance card. That little bugger didn’t even give her time to fully recover from 2015’s ileostomy takedown.

Eh, who needs physical strength and stamina anyway?

Hey, this isn’t funny…

My mother gave me permission to write about her condition and even advised I add humor. Were it not for her sense of humor throughout the daily ileostomy-bag changes and current bouts of digestive problems, she’d be a 110-pound ogre by now. And who could blame her?

On the plus side, her new diagnosis means more trips to New Hampshire for me and more time to pester my favorite feline. Oh how that furball loves me.

diva seeing me back again

My mom’s cat, aptly named Diva.

Oh, Good health, why do we put you at risk?

Our health is such a priceless commodity, isn’t it? And yet we humans are funny creatures. We purposely do things we know aren’t good for us. We smoke, drink excessively, consume gobs of sugar, skip wearing bike helmets, drive when we should walk, sit when we should stand, watch TV when we should sleep, and so on and so on.

Of course, many ailments (like my mother’s) aren’t due to our poor behaviors, and many of our poor behaviors aren’t due to a lack of willpower. Addiction and dependence play their roles. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t tackle them.

Because as my mother found out, when it comes to disease, Fate is cruel enough. Why help Her along with the process?

What’s one habit you could improve on when it comes to health?

Given my upcoming trips to New Hampshire and other obligations, I’ll be stepping away from my blog for the rest of March. You won’t see me around much on your sites either, and for that I apologize. But I’ll check in on Twitter and Facebook. After all, those pics of my mom’s cat won’t post themselves.

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Rubin4Carrie Rubin is the author of Eating Bull and The Seneca Scourge. For full bio, click here.

332 Responses to “It’s Easy to Take Our Health for Granted until It’s Taken from Us”

  1. A @ moylomenterprises

    My thoughts have been with you and your mom. Hope you and the family are well. Hope you had a peaceful Easter weekend.

    Hugs,
    A.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sean

    Hope your mom is getting through all that. She sounds like a very strong woman. You’re right that it’s way too easy to take good health for granted, at least until someone we love gets dealt a bad hand.

    Like

  3. recycledpennies

    My neighbor is currently reading your book, Eating Bull. I can’t wait to borrow it from her. We were discussing it on our walk to other day. So sorry to hear about your mother. I have been an ICU nurse for 15 years and the stories I could tell you would make one’s head pop right off. Medicine is an evil bitch complicated by emotions and surgeons that have absolutely no bedside manner while others earned the title of God due to their incredible patient outcomes.
    Best Regards to you and mom.
    Kristine D.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Carrie Rubin

      Thank you so much on all counts. I appreciate your well wishes for my mom and for taking the time to read and comment. And how nice to hear your neighbor is reading my book! I hope she’s enjoying it, and I hope you will too.

      I’m sure as an ICU nurse you have all sorts of stories to tell. It’s an intense environment, for sure. I imagine the burnout can be high. Of course, everything else then probably pales in comparison.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Beth Younker

        I just finished it this morning as a matter of fact, and loved it! As a former member of the obese club, I could totally relate to Jeremy, and understood a lot of what he was challenged with. Even now, feeling really good, and being at a healthy weight, those things continue to tempt and we forget how strong the pull of that is with our brain. Well done, thanks Carrie!

        Like

        • Carrie Rubin

          Thank you! I’m so glad you liked it. Very nice of you to let me know. I didn’t sugar coat things so my poor Jeremy suffered, but he came out okay in the end. 🙂 Thank you again. Happy weekend to you!

          Like

  4. Claudia

    Sorry it took me so long to find this. Having had breast cancer, I hear mixing trauma with humor. Good luck to your mom — with a funny daughter like you, she’ll recover in no time! Too bad I can’t say the same for her cat..hahaha…

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sue Slaght

    Carrie I am just catching up and so very sorry to read of your Mom’s diagnosis. This is not fair. Period. I admire her, and you, for using humor in the mix of treatment. With all she has been through their would be many who could not find that tool.
    One thing that I could do better as far as my health would be to move more frequently during the day. I do exercise but I find I am sitting behind a computer more hours than I should be.
    Now I am off to find you on Facebook. Sending hugs and positive energy to you and your Mom.

    Like

  6. roughwighting

    I’m so sorry to hear about your mom’s health troubles. Having a sense of humor, somehow, amidst it all is a testament to her character. I’m lucky to avoid surgery/doctors’ pokes/visits as much as possible. To do that, I exercise daily, eat pretty good (but don’t ask about sugar), meditate and practice yoga. I look at people who don’t take care of themselves and truly don’t understand why. It’s not that hard to eat broccoli or walk up and down the stairs. It’s much better than lying in a hospital bed.
    But back to me. What should I improve on? Yeah, sugar. But I ain’t giving it up!!!

    Like

    • Carrie Rubin

      Thank you. And it’s the same for me with sugar. That’s the thing I could improve on. But I doubt I’ll give it up completely. I enjoy my treats too much.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Carrie Rubin

      I exercise in the morning as soon as I get up. Then it’s done. But sugar intake…well…that’s what I need to improve on.

      Like

  7. Jay

    I hated to press Like on this because in fact I Dislike very much that your mother is sick, and sick again. There is nothing “fair” about illness. I’m glad she’s got you to help her navigate things and hope she’ll accept good thoughts and positivity from strangers on the internet.
    My best friend wore an ostomy bag as long as I knew here (she’d had the surgery in her early 20s – Crohn’s). They’re not super fun to grapple with, but better than the alternative. I don’t know of any silver linings to lymphoma though. That’s just crummy. I’m wishing her well and hoping her healing\recovery is speedy, and in full.

    Like

    • Carrie Rubin

      Thank you so much. I appreciate your well wishes. I know you’ve had your share of health issues. It stinks, for sure. I suspect your sense of humor has helped you survive as well.

      Like

  8. 2bcreativeblog

    I’m glad you can be there for her. That is actually one of my worst fears is having to deal with a bag. I think definitely cutting down on sugar is a top priority. Won’t give it up completely but will have smaller amounts. Best wishes for your mom and sense of humor is a must. 🙂

    Like

  9. philosophermouseofthehedge

    It must be the supermoons, asteroids, and eclipse – enough with the blood and guts, Universe! Wishing healing warmth and energy to your Mom ( Moms know best about the humor) So glad you are there as advocate – that is becoming more and more important and it lets you mom let go and relax knowing you’ve got a handle on all the medical stuff so she doesn’t have to try to decipher/remember it all.
    Toss that cat some mousies – you mom needs the fur companion.
    HUGs and hopes for best outcomes

    Like

    • Carrie Rubin

      Thank you. I appreciate your well wishes. It’s nice to be able to help her. It can be overwhelming for patient, so having an advocate is definitely helpful.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. carlamcgill

    My mom is in dire straits as well, and I wish you the joy of spending time with you mom. May she come through all of it well and reach equilibrium once again. All best.

    Like

  11. frederick anderson

    Best wishes to your mum. It’s remarkable (and not in the nicest way) how quickly the fates can step in. And in answer to your question; how long have you got? If I start the list now I can promise to finish by Friday?

    Like

  12. cinthiaritchie

    Take care, Carrie, and big hugs to you and your mom. Hope her health improves and that you both get to spend a lot of time soaking up the mother-daughter love.

    Like

  13. Sangeeta Pradhan RD, CDE

    Dear Carrie,
    Good luck with helping with your mom’s recovery. Keep that great sense of humor. will miss reading your posts, and will look forward to your return. You are now in my neck of the woods, as we are just across the border in MA. Take care.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Kourtney Heintz

    Carrie, my sense of humor is what got me through the worst of things with my back injury. Sometimes you have to laugh when things are at their worst. It’s the only relief you can give yourself.

    I am so sorry your mom has to deal with this. I’ll miss your posts and look forward to your return. Sending lots of strength and positive thoughts to you and your mom. Hugs.

    Like

  15. My Inner Chick

    Hoping you mother gets well soon, Carrie!!!
    YES, HEALTH is Everything. Why do we do the things we do then?
    Why do we hurt ourselves so badly?
    Are you your mother’s doctor? What kind of doctor are you?
    Love from MN.

    Like

    • Carrie Rubin

      Thank you! And no, I’m not my mother’s doctor. Hehe. I specialized in pediatrics. Wrong end of the spectrum. But I serve as her advocate.

      Like

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